Feb 10, 2012; Minneapolis, MN, USA; Minnesota Timberwolves mascot Crunch entertains fans during the fourth quarter against the Dallas Mavericks at Target Center. Mavericks won 104-97. Mandatory Credit: Greg Smith-US PRESSWIRE

Beasley Is Out Of The Building - Off To Phoenix You Go

Mar. 1, 2012; Phoenix, AZ, USA; Minnesota Timberwolves forward Michael Beasley reacts prior to the game against the Phoenix Suns at the US Airways Center. The Suns defeated the Timberwolves 104-95. Mandatory Credit: Mark J. Rebilas-US PRESSWIRE

After averaging 11.5 points, 4.4 rebounds, and a mere 1.0 assist per game last season with the Minnesota Timberwolves, the former #2 overall pick in 2008 will be seen with a different team once again.

Michael Beasley has agreed to the 3-year, $18 million deal with the Phoenix Suns and will join free agent point guard Goran Dragic, who will be returning to Phoenix after a stint with the Houston Rocket, with the team that plays in the desert.

In Beasley’s 4 NBA seasons thus far (2 with Miami and 2 with Minnesota), Beasley has been averaging 15.1 points per game. However, despite averaging solid numbers in his NBA career, consistency has been a problem for this young forward who is still trying to adapt to doing the right things while playing in an NBA game. Most of all, this guy was a player that could have easily been the #1 overall pick in the 2008 NBA Draft for the Chicago Bulls had the Bulls not decided to pick Derrick Rose. I wonder who turned out better?

Beasley’s best offensive season in the NBA was during his first season with the Wolves in 2010 when he averaged 19.2 points per game.

Unfortunately for Beasley, he won’t be playing with the 2-time MVP he hoped to be playing with at the U.S Airways Center for at least 41 games next season. Steve Nash, last night, was signed and traded to the Los Angeles Lakers. Fortunately, however, Beasley will be joined with rising star Eric Gordon who suffered an injury last season which set him back and his team, the New Orleans Hornets.

The Minnesota Timberwolves obviously showed no interest in keeping Beasley on the roster, and I certainly do understand why and I also agree of them not showing interest in the young, yet “lazy”, forward. The Timberwolves declined the $8 million option to keep Beasley on the team.

I have always talked and criticized Beasley about his on-court performances and how much Timberwolves fans at Target Center desperately want him out of the team. However, Beasley’s problems goes well beyond the NBA court. Last summer, Beasley was ticketed for possessing marijuana and speeding as well in a suburb in Minnesota. Furthermore, while playing for the Heat, Beasley has stated that he twice violated the NBA’s drug policy and entered a treatment facility in 2009.

Beasley’s on court style of play certainly would have been a virus for a team like the Timberwolves, who are developing into one of the better young teams not only in the Western Conference but in the entire league itself. Beasley is more of a one-on-one player and obviously with his 1.0 assists per game average last season, it shows that Beasley is not a team player but a player that tries desperately to put his team on his back when he actually can’t … well consistently.

The Suns, however, need players like him. At this point, the Suns have no star player and with Beasley ever-so-desperately wanting to become an NBA star, this is the place for him to develop and showcase his talents. In Minnesota he couldn’t develop with Love being the team’s leader and captain and with Adelman’s philosophy of team basketball.

Injuries also bothered Beasley in Minnesota which made the Timberwolves front office wonder if he was worth keeping as the team was doing well without him.

From all the Minnesota Timberwolves fans here in the Twin Cities, especially those fans who chant “Let’s trade Beasley” consistently every Wolves home game, “GOODBYE BEASLEY!” It’s like 4th of July once again for Minnesota … no offense Beasley. But seriously though …

Tags: Beasley Minnesota Timberwolves

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